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Dr Faye Wray

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Research Fellow

ORCID 0000-0001-9351-5019

Faye is a Research Fellow at the Academic Unit for Ageing and Stroke Research. Faye’s disciplinary background is in Psychology and she also holds an MSc in Health Services Research. Faye’s research interests include; longer-term care for stroke survivors; interventions targeting participation and societal reintegration for stroke survivors with aphasia; complex intervention development; and methods to enhance patient and public involvement in research.

Faye was awarded her PhD in 2018 and began a Postdoctoral Fellowship funded by the Stroke Association in 2019. This fellowship runs until April 2024 and focuses on co-producing and feasibility testing a supported self-management approach for stroke survivors with aphasia. The self-management approach aims to help stroke survivors with aphasia to develop strategies and confidence to cope with aphasia in everyday situations. Faye is primarily a qualitative researcher; she has worked in a variety of roles in applied health research since 2010. Faye is a thesis supervisor on the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Leeds and has also supervised health professionals undertaking Health Education England research internships.

Qualifications

  • PhD Medicine; University of Leeds, 2018
  • MSc Health Services Research; University of York, 2015
  • BA(Hons) Psychology; University of Manchester, 2009

Professional memberships

  • British Aphasiology Society
  • Collaboration of Aphasia Trialists

Recent Funding Awarded

Wray F, Clarke D, Cruice M. the Stroke Association. Develop and feasibility test a supported self-management intervention for stroke survivors with aphasia. Stroke Association Postdoctoral Fellowship £174,999.60, 16/09/2019-15/09/2022

Recent Publications

  • Coleman S, Wray F, Hudson K, Forster A, Conroy S, Tremyl J, Shenkin SD, Nixon J, Fader M, Goodwin VA, Woods D, Crossland S, Holt R, Mcgregor L, Maud R, Wyrko Z, Lamb SE, Teale E. Using consensus methods to prioritize modifiable risk factors for development of manifestations of frailty in hospitalized older adults. Nursing Open 2023;10(2):1016-1028. https://doi.org/10.1002/nop2.1370Wray F, Coleman S, Clarke D, Hudson K, Forster A, Teale, E. Risk factors for manifestations of frailty in hospitalized older adults: A qualitative study. Journal of Advanced Nursing 2022;78(6):1688– 1703. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.15120Crocker TF, Brown L, Lam N, Wray F, Knapp P, Forster A. Information provision for stroke survivors and their carers: Cochrane review. Stroke 2022;53(7):e269-e270. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.121.038162Crocker TF, Brown L, Lam N, Wray F, Knapp P, Forster A. Information provision for stroke survivors and their carers. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2021, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD001919. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.cd001919.pub4

    Wray F, Clarke D, Cruice M, Forster A. Development of a self-management intervention for stroke survivors with aphasia using co-production and behaviour change theory: An outline of methods and processes. PLoS One 2021;16(11):e0259103. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0259103

    Wray F, Clarke D, Forster A. How do stroke survivors with communication difficulties manage life after stroke in the first year? A qualitative study. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 2019;54(5). doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12487

    Wray F, Clarke DJ, Forster A. Post-stroke self-management interventions: a systematic review of effectiveness and investigation of the inclusion of stroke survivors with aphasia. Disability and Rehabilitation 2018;40(11):1237-1251. doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2017.1294206

    Wray F, Clarke D. Longer-term needs of stroke survivors with communication difficulties living in the community: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies BMJ Open 2017;7(10):e017944.